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Video: MDI Reports 2015: Insights and Information Webinar

MDI Reports 2015: Insights and Information. This webinar took place on june 3rd, 2015.

This year’s reports include an expanded set of results which include comparisons to the average of all participating school districts. These are exciting new changes that will offer increased value and new insights. Another new addition this year is "A Guide to Understanding your MDI Results", which includes definitions of terms used, a detailed explanation of scoring and a list of academic literature related to child well-being. Dr. Kimberly Schonert-Reichl, the MDI’s developer and HELP’s Interim Director, and Jennifer Fox, HELP’s Community Engagement Coordinator, walk through these updates and offer valuable insight into how you can move to action with your MDI results. To view reports for individual communities, please visit the MDI Maps & Data page.


Video: Children's Well-Being in their Middle Years Webinar

Thank you to all who participated in the Children's Well-Being in their Middle Years: New Research Highlights webinar, which took place on April 23rd, 2015.

The fourth and final web event in the HELP and Success by 6 Winter Webinar Series, this webinar focused on the Middle Years Development Instrument (MDI).  Joseph Dunn, Provincial Director, Success by 6 BC, and Dr. Kimberly Schonert-Reichl, Interim Director at HELP and Principal Investigator of the Middle Years Development Instrument, provided insight about the social and emotional lives of children both inside and outside of school as well as information about how to use the data to move to action.


Video: SES Index Webinar

Exploring HELP’s Socio-economic Status Index webinar took place on April 2nd, 2015.

The third in the HELP and Success by 6 Winter Webinar Series, this webinar focused on some of HELP’s latest supporting research - our Socio-economic Status (SES) Index.  Joseph Dunn, Provincial Director, Success by 6 BC, and Barry Forer, HELP Research Methodologist, explained what the SES Index is and how we can use it to study gradients in childhood vulnerability. This webinar explores regional differences and identifies some off-diagonal communities – those unusual neighbourhoods that are doing worse or better than the Index predicts.


Video: Bringing Knowledge Full Circle Webinar

Bringing Knowledge Full Circle: Aboriginal Children’s EDI Data and Community Stories webinar took place on February 26th, 2015.

The second in the HELP and Success by 6 Winter Webinar Series, this webinar showcased HELP’s Aboriginal-specific EDI data holdings.  Joseph Dunn, Provincial Director, Success by 6 BC, and Kim Bayer, HELP's Aboriginal Community Liaison Coordinator,  shared information about HELP's Aboriginal data, the role of the HELP Aboriginal Steering Committee is supporting this work, and how Aboriginal Early Years Tables across the province are working with this research data to support community planning.


Video: Critical Difference webinar

What’s the Difference? Using Critical Difference to Understand EDI Data webinar took place on January 27th 2015.

The first in the HELP and Success by 6 Winter Webinar Series, this webinar focuses on change over time - known as Critical Difference - in Early Development Instrument (EDI) scores. HELP Research Methodologist Barry Forer and HELP Geospatial Technical Lead Jay Douillard provide background and important information about Critical Difference and how to calculate it. In addition, Success by 6 Provincial Director, Joseph Dunn, was on hand to offer perspectives as an Early Years Community Development practitioner in BC.


Video: The impact of toxins on the developing brain

SFU professor, Bruce Lanphear explains the impact of toxins on children. The inescapable conclusion? Little things matter. This 7 minute video describes how extremely low levels of toxins can impact brain development. He explains how he and his colleagues have discovered the subtle shifts in the intellectual abilities of individual children have a big impact on the number of children in a population that are challenged or gifted. Steps should be taken to reduce children's exposure to toxins or suspected toxins. Bruce Lanphear is a professor in the Faculty of Health Sciences at Simon Fraser University. He is a friend of the Human Early Learning Partnership, a trusted professional we turn to when we're looking to understand the effects of toxins on children.


An Introduction to the Human Development Program of Research

HELP's Interim Director, Dr. Kimberly Schonert-Reichl explains a new vision: The Human Development Program of Research. This 40 minute video describes how researchers at the Human Early Learning Partnership aim to expand our understanding of the effects of early life experiences and environments on child well-being by measuring development at several key time points throughout the human lifespan.



HELP Webinar: MDI Results 2013-14

The Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP's) Associate Professor, Dr. Kimberly Schonert-Reichl discusses some results from the 2013-14 Middle Years Development Instrument. This is a 45 minute webinar presentation followed by a 15 minute question period. It was recorded on May 13th, 2014.


HELP Webinar: Child Development in the East Kootenay

The Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP's) Deputy Director, Joanne Schroeder, discusses some results from Wave 5 of the Early Development Instrument (EDI). Joanne speaks specifically to the trends in children's development in British Columbia's Southeast Kootenay area (School Districts 5 and 6).  This is a 45 minute webinar presentation followed by a 15 minute question period. It was recorded on May 5th, 2014.


HELP Webinar: The Middle Years Development Instrument

The Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP's) Associate Professor, Dr. Kimberly Schonert-Reichl discusses the Middle Years Development Instrument. This is a 45 minute webinar presentation followed by a 15 minute question period. It was recorded on March 13th, 2014.


HELP Webinar: Social Epigenetics

The Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP's) Associate Professor, Dr. Michael Kobor explains the science of Social Epigenetics. This is a 45 minute webinar presentation followed by a 15 minute question period. It was recorded on March 6th, 2014.


HELP Webinar: International Family Policy Comparisions: Why Canada lags behind

Canada lags behind most other industrial countries on many of the international family policy rankings, including public investments. In most provinces, this reflects the on-going fragmentation of both our systems for and our thinking about families with young children. And yet we know that provincial and federal policy environments have a profound effect on the wellbeing of Canadian families. In this webinar, HELP's Senior Researcher, Lynell Anderson explores what we can learn from international policy comparisons (with a focus on OECD countries including Norway, France, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Australia). What policy differences make a difference? She highlights key policy changes required to help children and families thrives in Canada. This webinar was recorded on February 19, 2014.


The Differences that make a Difference: Lessons from 12 years of early childhood research

HELP's Deputy Director, Joanne Schroeder presents lessons from 12 years of early childhood research with the Early Development Instrument (EDI). This webinar was recorded on February 11, 2014.


Dr. Michael Kobor Video

A brief video introducing epigenetic research at the Human Early Learning Partnership. Dr. Michael Kobor explains how early life experiences and environments affect our genes and consequently our well-being throughout our entire lifespan.


New HELP Video: Clyde's Key Messages

This new video is a compilation of a few of Dr. Clyde Hertzman's key messages. Clips were taken from various videos projects originally produced by the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, the Dalai Lama Center and the Human Early Learning Partnership.


HELP's Fall Research Expo 2012 Event Summary

Thank you for participating in HELP’s Fall Research Exposition 2012. The day was a great success and we are already planning next year’s event.

This post is intended to provide you with links to the keynote videos as well as access to some additional resources. 

Video Recordings

Dr. Kimberly Schonert-Reichl

Dr. Martin Guhn

Dr. Ziba Vaghri

Event Photos

We have posted a selection of pictures from this event on HELP's Flickr Page. If you would like to receive a copy of a particular image for your own personal use, please send your request to help.events@ubc.ca.

HELP Communication Materials

HELP's Fact Sheets, Research Briefs, and other communications materials are available for download from our Documents Library.

 


New HELP Fall Research Exposition keynote previews are now available

Want to learn more about HELP's October 24 Fall Research Exposition keynotes? Visit the HELP YouTube channel to view presentation preview videos featuring Dr. Martin Guhn, Dr. Kimberly Schonert-Reichl and Dr. Ziba Vaghri.

The afternoon workshop session is completely full but there are still some seats available for the morning keynote sessions. To learn more and register, please visit HELP's Events page.


HELP Fall Expo 2012 Trailer and Keynote Preview

Join us on Wednesday, October 24, 2012 for HELP's Fall Research Expo 2012!

Last year’s Research Exposition connected the dots across the first 10 years of HELP’s research. This year, we will focus on the future, highlighting emerging child development research at HELP. We will highlight:

  • The Middle Years Development Instrument in British Columbia
  • Child Development Trajectories: Looking Forward to the Future
  • Monitoring Rights in Early Childhood

The full day event will comprise of a morning keynote session, hosted by Dr. Clyde Hertzman, which will explore the three research streams. It will continue with a number of afternoon workshops on HELP research topics, offering participants an opportunity to examine the research streams in more depth, exchange ideas and build skills.

Register Now! | Visit our events page for more information


Latest B.C. business leader video now online

Debi Hewson, CEO of Odlum Brown, explains why she believes business leaders must marry their corporate values with their family values.

This is the second of five videos outlining why provincial business leaders have become concerned about work life conflict among parents with young children. This theme is central in Paul Kershaw's research concerning family policy and his New Deal for Families policy recommendations.

Visit Dr. Kershaw’s A New Deal for Canadian Families blog to learn more about his research, including Generation Squeeze and his family policy recommendations.


New B.C business leaders video series launched

Warren Beach, CFO of Sierra Systems, is interviewed in the first of five videos outlining why provincial business leaders have become concerned about work life conflict among parents with young children. This theme is central in Paul Kershaw's research concerning family policy and his New Deal for Families policy recommendations.

Mr. Beach provided a third party perspective to Dr. Kershaw's research and analysis. His video interview explains why he got involved with Dr. Kershaw's research and how substantial the costs of absenteeism, turnover and employee health really are to businesses across the British Columbia.

In addition, Debi Hewson, CEO Odlum Brown, Yuri Fulmer, CEO FDC Capital, and Anita Huberman, CEO Surrey Board of Trade, are briefly interviewed. Watch for their videos regarding the effects of parental work life conflict on B.C. businesses to be posted soon. 

Visit Dr. Kershaw’s A New Deal for Canadian Families blog to learn more about his research including Generation Squeeze and his family policy recommendations.


Now online: Presentations from the December 2011 Arthur M. Sackler Colloquia of the National Academy of Sciences

Entitled Biological Embedding of Early Social Adversity: From Fruit Flies to Kindergarters, the Sackler Colloquia focused on socioeconomic position as the single most powerful determinant of health and development within every human society on earth. Rapidly accumulating evidence suggests that differential exposure to early childhood adversities contributes strongly to the observed social disparities in mental and physical health, cognitive and socioemotional development, and lifetime educational and economic attainment. Studies in a broad array of species, ranging from invertebrates to human and nonhuman primates, are elucidating fundamental mechanisms by which social stratification is induced and maintained and by which socially partitioned adversities are transduced into neurobiological and genomic processes. Using new developmental neurogenomic approaches, science is poised to finally understand why disease, disorder and developmental misfortune are so unevenly distributed within human populations. This colloquium convened a world class, cross disciplinary assembly of basic, biomedical, and social scientists to explore the biological embedding of early social adversity across multiple species, from fruit flies to human kindergartners.

Speakers included Clyde Hertzman, Tom Boyce, Janet Werker, Michael Kobor and many others. See HELP researcher presentation below and visit the Sackler Colloquia's YouTube Channel to view the other presentations.

The Arthur M. Sackler ...

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KidCareCanada Launches new video

KidCareCanada Society and Vancouver Native Health Society launched the DVD “Emotional Safety” at Sheway, in Vancouver’s Downtown East Side on October 26, 2011.

Three Minute Promo of Emotional Safety

more videos

Compelling research points to the importance of early attachment and nurture for the life-long well-being of a child. The Emotional Safety DVD bridges the gap between research and the practice so that all new parents can be informed about what their baby really needs, and how they can provide it.

Researchers interviewed as part of the video include Tom Boyce, Janet Werker and Adele Diamond.

A community launch of the video will take place November 23, 2011 at the Phil Bouvier Centre.


2011 Fall Research Exposition Event Summary

Thank you for participating in HELP’s Fall Research Exposition: 10 Years of Insight - Connecting the Dots. The day was a great success. This page is intended to provide you with access to resources that will help you continue this important work in your own community. Please click here for a PDF of the agenda from this event.

Video Recordings

The 'Cell to Society' Approach to Early Child Development

Dr. Clyde Hertzman, Director, HELP

What the Genes Remember: The New Epigenetics of Early Life

Dr. W. Thomas Boyce, Professor, HELP and CCCHR

Does Canada Work for All Generations?

Dr. Paul Kershaw, Associate Professor, CFIS, HELP

International Dialogue (Session 1): How to Put Research into Action in Communities

Dr. Joan Lombardi, Deputy Assistant Secretary and Inter-Departmental Liaison for Early Childhood Development, U.S. Dept of Health and Human Services
Anne Hanning, Indigenous Researcher and National Coordinator, Australian Early Development Index
Tracy Smyth, Community Facilitator, Alberni Valley Make Children First Network

Posters

Dr. Jennifer E.V. Lloyd
Early experiences matter: Lasting effect of concentrated disadvantage on children’s language and cognitive outcomes (PDF)

Dr. Brenda Poon and the Early Childhood Screening Research and Evaluation Unit
Early Childhood Screening Research and Evaluation (PDF ...

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Paul Kershaw on Studio 4

Paul Kershaw speaks with Studio 4 host Fanny Kiefer about the growing challenges for young families. He is one of Canada's leading thinkers about family policy, receiving two national prizes from the Canadian Political Science Association for his research.


Three new HELP videos


Watch the three new short videos of Clyde Hertzman, Tom Boyce and Paul Kershaw discussing their work and its importance.

Dr. Hertzman presents HELP's cell to society research model used to explore early childhood development. Dr. Boyce discusses how the stresses and adversities of growing up in socio-economically disadvantaged environments get inside us and affect the biology that determines lifelong metal and physical illness. Finally, Dr. Kershaw explains why it is in everyone's interest to shape public policy to support young families with children.

Clyde Hertzman

Tom Boyce

Paul Kershaw


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